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Entries in Foreign Editons (5)

Friday
May172013

Taking the plunge

There's nothing quite like cracking off the mental rust and having that first productive day of a new book. Granted, there are invariably a host of dead-ends, pitfalls, and blind curves ahead of me, but it feels good to insert the key into the ol' creative ignition, give it a turn and hear (with relief) a humming engine.

With WILLOW FROST waiting in the wings, I've jumped from research to actual writing on my currently untitled book #3. I can't say much at this point, just that it's another Seattle tale—I thought I'd do at least three before venturing elsewhere. This novel is set between 1909 and 1959. And it's another emotional roller coaster, a bit of a noble romantic tragedy if you will. Hopefully I'll find some moments of redemption.

In other news, foreign rights to SONGS OF WILLOW FROST have been sold in Italy, Norway, Germany, Brazil, France, Australia/New Zealand, and the UK (which will also release the book on September 10).

And I'll be at Book Expo America in NYC at the end of the month, along with 499 other authors on autograph row. But, if you're near the Big Apple and would like to get your hands on an Advance Reader's Copy of WILLOW, here's your chance.

Peace, everyone.

Thursday
Mar212013

I love the smell of printers' ink in the morning. It smells like, victory

We're so close. Seriously close. I know, September 10th is still several months away. (Actually 172 days, 8 hours, and 43 minutes, but who's counting?)

For authors this is a time of furious activity: writing author's notes, acknowledgments, proofing galley pages (see above on the right) and watching with nervous anticipation as advance reader copies (see above left) go out to...advance readers. Who are these mysterious people? Well, they tend to be key book buyers, industry bigwigs, and also a few relatives who it's always nice to remind that, yes, I am still gainfully employed.

Also these early manuscripts go out to foreign editors, so as I merrily type this WILLOW has already found a home in Italy, Norway, Brazil, and the UK.

Oh, and in case you're wondering, no, that's not the actual book cover. That cake is still baking. But soon, so very soon, we'll serve it up.

Tuesday
Feb072012

Konbanwa to readers in Japan

Finally, Hotel on the Corner of You Know What is available in Japan. In fact, here's a link to KINOKUNIYA, where the Japanese Edition is now on sale (There's a KINOKUNIYA bookstore in Seattle as well).

A huge arigatou gozaimas to Kazuhira Maeda, English Professor at Naruto University for the wonderful translation. I cannot thank you enough.

In other news, I've been writing like a madman. More on that soon.

Ja, mata ashita aimashou.


Friday
Oct212011

Das Frankfurt Buchmesse

Ahhh...finally adjusting to life in the Mountain Time Zone once again after a week in Germany for the Frankfurt Buchmesse (Book Fair).

My agent described Frankfurt as the "least charming city in all of Europe," and I'm afraid that description was painfully apt. Plus my impression was compounded by staying at Hotel Roomers—an ultra-stylish, avant garde auberge that featured carpet-less rooms with black walls, black floors, black furnishings, black bedding, black curtains, and painfully dim mood lighting. The ambiance was so bleak and depressing I now affectionately refer to Roomers as the "Shoot-myself-in-the-face-hotel."

The Agent Room. (Think speed dating for editors)But aside from that, the Frankfurt Book Fair was a sight to behold. Especially the agent room, which resembled an upscale sweat-shop or prison visiting room, with rows and rows of desks stretching on as far as the eye could see. Editors and agents flit from desk to desk, often having 20 meetings in a single day.

And I did manage to escape for a bit to visit Heidelberg and the Rhineland, where I was able to unleash my four years of high school German upon unsuspecting waiters, taxi drivers, and merchants everywhere. My apologies. Or auf Deutsch, "Es tut mir leid."